For Immediate Release

July 17, 2014
Contact: Kristie M. Greco
Phone: (202) 267-3883

The FAA was in contact with US carriers following the crash of Malaysian Air Flight 17. The agency confirms that carriers have voluntarily agreed not to operate in the airspace near the Russian-Ukraine border. The FAA is monitoring the situation to determine whether further guidance is necessary.
Background
On April 3, the FAA issued a Notice to Airman (NOTAM) prohibiting U.S. flight operations until further notice in the airspace over the Crimean region of Ukraine, and portions adjacent to the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov.
The NOTAM does not currently cover the airspace where Malaysian Air flight 17 crashed.
This action was taken due to the unilateral and illegal action by Russia to assert control over Crimean airspace, including international airspace administered by Ukraine without agreement by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).
This creates the potential for conflicting air traffic control instructions from Ukrainian and Russian authorities and for the related potential misidentification of civil aircraft in this airspace. This prompted the FAA NOTAM for U.S. flights.
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TWA FLIGHT 800:   NTSB PRESS RELEASE
NOTE:  THE DATE OF THE TWA FLIGHT 800 ACCIDENT OCCURRED ON JULY 17, 1996.... 18 YEARS AGO TO THE DAY, OF MALAYSIA AIRLINE FLIGHT MH17 INCIDENT....

NTSB Press Release

National Transportation Safety Board
Office of Public Affairs

NTSB Denies Petition on 1996 Crash of TWA Flight 800

July 2

The National Transportation Safety Board today denied a petition for reconsideration of its findings in the investigation of the 1996 crash of TWA flight 800.
The petition was filed in June 2013 by a group called The TWA 800 Project. Petitioners claimed a "detonation or high-velocity explosion" caused the crash.
"Our investigations are never 'closed'," said Acting Chairman Christopher A. Hart. "We always remain open to the presentation of new evidence." Before responding to the petition, NTSB staff met with the petitioners' representatives and listened to an eyewitness who described what he saw on the night of the accident. After a thorough review of all the information provided by the petitioners, the NTSB denied the petition in its entirety because the evidence and analysis presented did not show the original findings were incorrect.
To consider the petition, the NTSB assembled a team of investigators not previously involved with the original investigation. For more on the NTSB's response, please see twa800.sites.usa.gov.
Office of Public Affairs
490 L'Enfant Plaza, SW
Washington, DC 20594
Kelly Nantel
(202) 314-6100
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NTSB Stands By Investigation of 1996 Crash of TWA Flight 800

On July 17, 1996, TWA flight 800 exploded while climbing to its cruise altitude shortly after departure from New York’s JFK International Airport. It crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near East Moriches, New York, taking the lives of the 230 passengers and crew on board.
In August 2000, the NTSB completed its exhaustive 4-year investigation into the accident. This remains one of the largest transportation accident investigations in US history.
In the aftermath of the crash, terrorism was widely suspected. The NTSB conducted its accident investigation, while at the same time, the FBI conducted a criminal investigation. Neither investigation found evidence of a crime, and the FBI ended the criminal probe in 1997.
The NTSB’s accident investigation continued. The NTSB carefully considered all of the evidence, including both the physical evidence and the witness summary documents provided by the FBI.
In our final analysis (Aviation Accident Report AAR0003), the NTSB determined that an explosion of the center wing fuel tank was the probable cause of the accident. The explosion resulted from ignition of the flammable fuel/air mixture in the tank.